Friday, September 4, 2015

[52 Snapshots of Life} Week 36, Technology


Technology on the farm.

I was trying to figure out how "technology" would best be described through the eyes of a farm and farm dogs.  This tractor and hay rake were sitting out in the field since we're getting ready to bale 3rd cutting. I saw it and had an "aha!" moment. 

The dogs love to go check out all the equipment when it is not running because they NEVER get to see it up close when it is.

This picture is a contrast in technology, old and new.  The tractor is from the 1970s and the hay rake is brand new this season. My husband was thrilled to have something that hadn't already been owned by someone else. 

The tractor is very low tech compared to what is currently available, but it does what we need it to do. The rake has a computer board that is set up to accommodate depth, width, and a bunch of other stuff that I don't deal with.

Living on a farm and working it provide a perspective that not many people have.  Farming depends alot on weather and timing.  This tractor or that piece of equipment are needed for any given job. Growing and cutting hay requires different machinery than growing corn or wheat or beans; all common crops in our area.

The reality of farming is that equipment is all pretty expensive.  Not many farmers can have all new stuff. Even equipment from this decade is almost out of reach.  For example, this picture shows a 15 year old semi with a 20 year old trailer used for moving hay; a 15 year old tractor with a 10 year old baler, a 12 year old swather for cutting hay, a feed wagon of undetermined age, a 30 year old horse trailer, a small wagon of questionable age and origin.......all in just one shot!  




In many aspects, what we use would be considered old. However, in farming, it is very common to be using machinery that is 10, 20, 30 or even more years old.  We have one baler that is 50 years old and still works;  In the automobile world, it would be an antique not a work horse.

We'd love to have a brand new tractor, but last I saw those things are $200k plus.  For that price, you'd think they could go out and do the whole job via remote. Probably won't have one this year. And maybe not ever.  But that's ok.  We get done what needs to get done with what we've got.

We're following the 52 Snapshots of Life blog hop hosted by The Lazy Pit Bull.






11 comments:

  1. That's crazy! I can't believe how expensive all that equipment is.

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    1. Saw a funny poster. Brand new $300k tractor with gorgeous super models draped over it. "This is what happened when they found out how much this ride costs!" Pretty much covers it.

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  2. I grew up on a farm, so I love anything to do with them! LOL!
    ღ husky hugz ღ frum our pack at Love is being owned by a husky!

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  3. Very cool! I've always dreamed of owning a farm, but I imagine the reality of it is a lot of hard work and it has to be tough to keep up with the times financially. Very cool photos and equipment...that rake looks like it's really something!

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    1. You learn to be resourceful. The rake is really cool! I can't even fathom all that it is capable of. It's all worth it!

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  4. Whoa! I’ll bet all that’s automated and WAAAAYYY out of most people’s price range.

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    1. That's why people who farm often buy equipment that is so old. They learn to be great mechanics!

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  5. Can't thank you enough for bringing a farming perspective to this week's word! You are so right that a major problem for farmers is keeping up with ever-evolving (expensive) technology. Thank you for farming. I know you don't get enough appreciation. Without you, where would we all be? Love the photo of the Aussies too.

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